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Barbers say mullet hairsytle is making a comeback – Cornwall Live

The party at the back style was popular in the 80s
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A barber claims the mullet haircut popular in the late 80s is making a comeback.
The 'business at the front, party at the back' hairstyle features long hair running down a man's neck, while the top is cut short and neat.
Barbers No1 has 12 branches across Liverpool, and says it has seen a resurgence in the style in recent months, reports The Echo.
In an Instagram post sharing a series of mullet photos, the barbering company wrote: "Did someone say MULLET?!
"We've seen so many different variations coming in our stores recently! Most definitely one of the more bolder haircuts!
"Have you got what it takes? Book now across our 12 stores via our website!"
Rob McClintock, manager of the Barbers No1 Whitechapel, said the haircuts have been seen on students who have moved to Liverpool from across the country,
Rob said: "We took over the 051 store in January, but because of lockdowns it feels like we've not long opened.
"It's definitely a bold look, and we're seeing people ask for them more and more.
"I think it started with students who have moved here but it could become a wider thing."
When asked if Rob would try one himself, he replied: "I can't, I'm bald."
Rob Ayton, 31, a graphic designer from Bideford in Devon, recently won the crown for having the World's Best Mullet at the annual Mulletfest, held in Kurri Kurri, New South Wales, Australia.
Rob said: "I was coming out here for a skateboarding competition and it just happened to time with me being out here for that so I could go out to Kurri Kurri and see the mullet fest itself.
"There was eight of us from all over the globe, it was good fun, a good laugh.
"Three years ago I came over to Australia got a mullet haircut, chopped it up in irony really.
"I've never been a fan of the mullet or the rats tail, but I have to say I do like the mullet now so my point of view has changed dramatically.
"It genuinely feels like it's been a religious ceremony for me, Australia – you've been amazing."
Rob said at the time that his hair was down to his shoulder blades, and growing a good mullet takes: "Time and patience, and being able to handle a s**t ton of negative feedback."
Mulletfest is an annual event that honours the best mullet cuts in various styles and categories, including everyday, grubby, vintage, and extreme, among others.
Their website states: "All competition entrants are judged on their haircut, overall presentation and stage presence."
The winner of the illustrious 'Best Mullet of them All' category is crowned on the day.

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